How Back to Basics Does It Have to Be?

There was a discussion on one of the fiber arts groups on Facebook this morning about “cheating” by using a knitting loom. When your hobby is already practicing an old-fashioned back-to-basics skill like spinning or knitting, how basic does it have to be? Do we rank the “basicness” of our hobbies? Do we judge others based on whether they are struggling as much as we are for our art?

Introduction to Eco Printing

What is eco printing? This is a form of natural dyeing using direct-to-fabric or -paper printing from leaves, stems or flowers. Almost all plants have some color in them that can be transferred directly to the surface of fabric or paper, leaving the impression of the leaf shape on the cloth. Generally, the artist India …

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From Sheep to Shawl: Dirty to Clean

I’m delighted to present a guest blog written by Heather Wallace on her Sheep to Shawl journey. Like many of us in the fiber arts, she was first captivated by handspinning when she saw a public demonstration. Here is the story of her Sheep to Shawl project: How It Got Started    Since you’re reading this …

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Fibers Under a Microscope

Let’s get up close with some wool, silk, and mohair Nuno felt fibers. Really, really close. I always wanted to see the difference between types of fiber under a microscope, and got a chance today. You see, I live with a science teacher and I decided a few weeks ago that he really needed a …

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Blog

Welcome to the SlowYarn.com Blog! Handspinning, dyeing, eco-printing, being an artist in a crafting world, wool allergies… if it has to do with fibers I’ll probably write about it! Check out the rest of SlowYarn.com for lots of information, how-tos, and pictures! Follow the menu above, or click here to start with About Slow Yarn. …

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How to Shibori With Natural Dyes

  I’ve been playing. Obsessing, really. I broke out the Indigo and started to experiment this week. I wanted to try the Shibori tie-dyeing process using all natural dyes. You see, Indigo is kind of messy– at first. Once you make the initial batch, though, the stock can be used again and again before the …

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